John Baird endorses Anthony Furey for Toronto mayor
John Baird endorses Anthony Furey for Toronto mayor

Former Harper-era cabinet minister John Baird has endorsed Anthony Furey for his campaign to become Toronto’s next mayor in the upcoming byelection on June 26th. 

Baird, a former minster of foreign affairs, transport, and environment in the government of and a high-profile figure in the Conservative movement in Canada, announced his support for Furey’s campaign in a video posted to social media, lauding Anthony’s platform to tackle Toronto’s big challenges.

“I care passionately about Toronto, I care passionately about our city, and I’m thrilled to endorse Anthony Furey for mayor,” said Baird. 

“He’ll clean up the city, he’ll deal with congestion, and he’ll tackle the big challenges that Toronto is facing.”

Furey thanked Baird for his endorsement and took a jab at his fellow candidates who he says “wrote the book on the status quo.”

“You know something exciting is happening in this race when so many prominent people have come forward to endorse my candidacy,” said Furey.

“The status quo isn’t working anymore – and most of my opponents wrote the book on the status quo.”

Furey, who is currently on leave as True North’s VP of editorial and content, has attracted support from notable figure across the political spectrum. His supporters include former Liberal MPs Dennis Mills and Dan McTeague, and renowned conservative figures like Dr. Jordan Peterson, former Conservative finance minister Joe Oliver, and former Progressive Conservative MPP Roman Baber.

Other endorsements include the centre-right TDSB trustee Dr. Weidong Pei, Toronto-based celebrity chef Mark McEwan, and Newstalk 1010 host Jerry Agar.

Recent polls show that Furey has been gaining ground and surpassing mainstream candidates like Beaches-East York councillor Brad Bradford, former deputy mayor Ana Bailão, and former Liberal MPP Mitzie Hunter. 

Olivia Chow still leads the pack with over 30% support from Toronto’s decided voters. However, around 27% of voters have yet to pick a candidate to support. 

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